Posts Tagged ‘ PaaS ’

Is It Time to Stop Making Excuses for Cloud Outages? (BizTechMagazine)

Is It Time to Stop Making Excuses for Cloud Outages? (BizTechMagazine)

  Ricky Ribeiro (@ricktagious) of BizTech Magazine (@BizTechMagazine) has penned a few thoughtful comments on my latest blog, Time To Stop Forgiving Cloud Providers for Repeated Failures: Some cloud pundits say, “Hey, no technology is up all the time. Deal with it and plan for outages.” But Andi Mann, vice president of strategic solutions at CA Technologies, says enough is enough when it comes to excusing cloud outages. In a bold post on his blog, Mann strikes back at the notion that downtime is inevitable in IT. You can read the whole article over at BizTech Magazine online -  http://www.biztechmagazine.com/article/2013/01/it-time-stop-making-excuses-cloud-outages    

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Time To Stop Forgiving Cloud Providers for Repeated Failures

Time To Stop Forgiving Cloud Providers for Repeated Failures

For a long time now, cloud pundits – service providers, boosters, analysts, vendors, and other mostly vested interests – have stood behind a curtain of “downtime happens, design for failure” when assessing cloud outages. It seems that with every new failure, the self-styled clouderati repeatedly implore IT leaders to believe that, despite what we are seeing with our own eyes on an almost weekly basis, cloud providers are better at IT than you are. Over and over, the pundits’ response is a yet another chorus of, “Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain!” Rather, CIOs and others are implored to simply trust the great and powerful Oz (or is that ‘Aws’?) to provide better uptime than their own in-house IT services.

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10 Ways IT Can Own Cloud Decisions

10 Ways IT Can Own Cloud Decisions

How IT leaders can bring the true value of cloud computing to their organizations. Much of the hype surrounding cloud computing is causing confusion among enterprise IT looking to cloud to solve problems and hoping not to introduce more. Unfortunately several sources ranging from industry experts to news articles to well-known technology evangelists seem to be providing more questions around cloud than answers. IT needs some clarity and guidance to ensure their cloud endeavors produce the promised benefits. To be certain, the public cloud is a fantastic thing. It has a role to play for consumers, and even for many businesses (what’s wrong with using Gmail or Google Apps for your business?). And cloud computing for business, government, and other organizations is, without doubt, the future of IT. But we need to have at it with eyes wide open. Here are ten things IT needs to do to take ownership of…

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Are community cloud services the next hot thing?

Are community cloud services the next hot thing?

I was interviewed recently for a great article on community cloud services published today in NetworkWorld, by Brandon Butler. Here is just a short excerpt: From a vendor perspective, community clouds let service providers distinguish themselves in a growingly-crowded cloud market place, said Andi Mann, vice president of enterprise and cloud solutions for CA Technologies. For example, numerous providers offer a range of infrastructure as a service (IaaS) products that appeal to a broad base of customers – vendors include Amazon Web Services, RackSpace, Terremark and Savvis. An offering by a vendor targeted for an individual market though can distinguish that provider and allow it to offer complimentary services to the industry as well. A healthcare IaaS cloud provider, for example, can also provide health-care related software as a service (SaaS), or even PaaS offerings, all targeted for that industry. “It’s the difference between providing servers, and providing a service,”…

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Real-World Applications for the Private Cloud

Real-World Applications for the Private Cloud

Not surprisingly, since the release of my new book, Visible Ops – Private Cloud, I have been talking with a lot of people about how to deploy private cloud, where to start, what to avoid, etc. So far, the most common question has been, “What type of existing workloads are organizations putting into private cloud environments today – and what are they avoiding?” So I thought I would jot down some of my answers, specifically related to ‘cloud-migrant’ services, as opposed to ‘cloud-native’ services – and without getting too hung up on whether the use cases are 100% cloud or not! One recurrent use case is to provide dynamic desktop allocation, especially for education and projects use cases. A number of schools, universities, training centers, and even some larger enterprises, have adopted private cloud to allocate servers, clients, applications and data for reusable desktop systems. This seems especially prevalent for…

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A Service Taxonomy for Cloud Choices

A Service Taxonomy for Cloud Choices

I have been talking with many CIOs for some time about strategic adoption of cloud solutions. A key step in these conversations is always the review of the portfolio of services they provide to business users, so they can choose which clouds to adopt and why. This has led me to describe a high-level taxonomy that segments the service portfolio according to the different cloud requirements, capabilities, and approaches in different types of applications and services.

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Why Large Enterprises Need Public Cloud Too

Why Large Enterprises Need Public Cloud Too

In several recent posts, I have concentrated on the benefits of private cloud for large enterprises. For example: Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Cloud: The Evolutionary Path The cost benefit myth of the public cloud Launching my first book – Visible Ops Private Cloud Public Cloud Computing is NOT For Everyone However, I want to be very clear about something: Public cloud offers great benefits, even – or especially – for large organizations. Public cloud may well be the only IT architecture ever needed for most small organizations, many startups, and some emerging enterprises. Why build even a server cupboard, let alone a data centre, if you don’t need to? And many of these organizations will never need to. However, even large enterprises should use public cloud. It certainly offers substantial benefits for large enterprises too, including: cost reductions – avoiding any upfront spend on hardware can drive down the cost…

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Launching my first book – Visible Ops Private Cloud

Launching my first book – Visible Ops Private Cloud

Today is a very exciting day for me. After many months of blood, sweat, and tears, today we are finally launching a brand new book that I co-wrote (alongside a couple of amazing people – Kurt Milne and Jeanne Morain), called Visible Ops Private Cloud: From Virtualization to Private Cloud in 4 Practical Steps. I am certainly excited because this is my very first ‘real’ book – a hard-copy print volume (Kindle and PDF versions will be available soon too), available for purchase on Amazon.com and ITPI.org, with a real ISBN and everything! But that is not the only reason. I am excited to be working with the book’s publisher, the IT Process Institute. The ITPI is a renowned independent research organization “that exists to support the membership of IT operations, security, and audit professionals” with a  mission “to identify practices that are proven to improve the performance of IT…

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New Cloud Reference Architecture From NIST

New Cloud Reference Architecture From NIST

So, here is something interesting I discovered today, courtesy of a tweet from Christian Reilly (@ReillyUSA) – the US federal agency, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), today released Version 1 of their Cloud Computing Reference Architecture (PDF). It is free and, like all US Federal Government content, it is open. I have written about NIST before – both in my research work at EMA and in my personal blog – and wholeheartedly endorse their excellent definitions for cloud computing. If we can trust them to define time – and a thousand more standards besides – we can trust them to define cloud. So I am more than willing to let them have a go at describing a cloud reference architecture.

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In Cloud Computing, Downtime is Endemic – But Does it Matter?

In Cloud Computing, Downtime is Endemic – But Does it Matter?

There is a perennial debate in cloud computing about whether a failure of one cloud service provider can be more generalized to a “failure of cloud computing”. It is an important question because availability is a key decision factor in choosing between private and public cloud, and between public cloud providers. The most recent example of such failures is the power outage at IaaS provider Rackspace’s London facility, but of course, we have seen this before from many public cloud providers – including Rackspace in particular, and not just once. SaaS provider Salesforce.com (and its PaaS arm, Force.com) has also had one outage already this year, an event that is far from unusual, and nothing new. Amazon, Yahoo, Microsoft, GoGrid, RIM, Twitter, Paypal and many others have also had substantial (and often repeated) outages.

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What is Wrong With the NIST Definition of Cloud Computing?

What is Wrong With the NIST Definition of Cloud Computing?

I am getting so sick of the continual bickering over definitions of cloud computing. Even more frustrating is the hype from all the vested interests – vendors and analysts, mostly – trying to define cloud computing in ways that they imagine will best contribute to their own commercial success. And I know that I am not alone. What is wrong with the definition that the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) – a division of the US Department of Commerce – uses?

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