Posts Tagged ‘ NIST ’

VMworld Wrap Up: Extending VMware for Mission-critical Virtualization and Cloud

VMworld Wrap Up: Extending VMware for Mission-critical Virtualization and Cloud

I had a great time at VMworld 2011 Las Vegas this year. As I predicted in my last blog post, I met with loads of amazing people – too many to list out here, let alone in 140 on Twitter! I also saw some great technology in the solutions exchange, dropped in on some fascinating sessions, and of course enjoyed some excellent meals, drinks, and parties! I was also very pleased to present on Extending the Value of Your VMware Solutions to Design, Deliver and Maintain Reliable, Mission-critical Virtualization and Cloud Services. I certainly was not there to ‘pitch’ any CA Technologies products or solutions (after all, I know that no one wants a sales pitch at a tradeshow like VMworld). Instead, I tried to provide strategic advice to the audience on how to look at their migration to cloud, and especially how to extend VMware’s excellent virtualization and cloud…

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New Cloud Reference Architecture From NIST

New Cloud Reference Architecture From NIST

So, here is something interesting I discovered today, courtesy of a tweet from Christian Reilly (@ReillyUSA) – the US federal agency, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), today released Version 1 of their Cloud Computing Reference Architecture (PDF). It is free and, like all US Federal Government content, it is open. I have written about NIST before – both in my research work at EMA and in my personal blog – and wholeheartedly endorse their excellent definitions for cloud computing. If we can trust them to define time – and a thousand more standards besides – we can trust them to define cloud. So I am more than willing to let them have a go at describing a cloud reference architecture.

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Cloud Computing in the Public Sector

Cloud Computing in the Public Sector

If there was still any doubt about the real world use cases for cloud computing, the US Federal Government last week published a 38-page report  entitled “State of Public Sector Cloud Computing” (link to PDF at CIO.gov). Attributed to the Federal CIO Vivek Kundra, it is stamped with the seal/logo of the CIO Council, which comprises the CIOs of some 28 federal government agencies. The report details 30 case studies in public sector cloud computing (for both state and federal governments), covering IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS service models; using private, public, community, and hybrid cloud deployment models; with both on-premise and off-premise implementations. Measurable Benefits from Key Case Studies After perfunctorily reciting what it calls “the broadly recognized and adopted NIST Definition of Cloud Computing,” and using the opportunity to briefly push its own barrow on cloud standards (a subject I plan to blog about in more detail at another…

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In Cloud, ITIL, and SOE – Heterogeneity is the New Standard

In Cloud, ITIL, and SOE – Heterogeneity is the New Standard

I read recently a good blog post from Thomas Bittman (@tombitt) of Gartner Group, about how sometimes close enough is good enough. Talking specifically about private cloud, he talked about how an ‘imperfect’ cloud deployment – one that does not have all five essential characteristics, for example – might be enough for some organizations. I especially appreciated how he highlighted some very specific, real-world examples to sustain his advice. As he shows, sometimes you don’t need a ‘100%’ implementation, and for very good business reasons. Not every IT organization needs a fully self-service interface, and many smaller organizations see no value in usage metering. They simply want to deliver services faster. For them, a 70% private cloud is absolutely good enough … it all comes down to business requirements, return on investment, and future strategy. How far you go is your decision. via Driving for Imperfection With Your Private Cloud.…

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Virtualization is not Cloud … but Cloud needs Virtualization

Virtualization is not Cloud … but Cloud needs Virtualization

Surfing  a couple of blogs today, jumping from another analyst commenting that virtualization is not cloud (a fair, if unexplored, post), I came across William Vambenepe’s post from September on the confusion between virtualization and Cloud Computing. As he did on my blog recently, I started to post a reply to his site, and then as it expanded, decided to post it as a full reply on my own blog. I like the thinking, and agree with a lot of the principles involved. Without doubt, virtualization is not cloud. But I can’t agree with it all. Apart from technical quibbles (like the part about mainframe LPARs not running on a hypervisor), I simply find it unreasonable, if not impossible, to think of implementing cloud computing without virtualization.

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What is Wrong With the NIST Definition of Cloud Computing?

What is Wrong With the NIST Definition of Cloud Computing?

I am getting so sick of the continual bickering over definitions of cloud computing. Even more frustrating is the hype from all the vested interests – vendors and analysts, mostly – trying to define cloud computing in ways that they imagine will best contribute to their own commercial success. And I know that I am not alone. What is wrong with the definition that the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) – a division of the US Department of Commerce – uses?

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