Posts Tagged ‘ IBM ’

IBM mainframe cloud innovation. Worst oxymoron evar? Or …

IBM mainframe cloud innovation. Worst oxymoron evar? Or …

There was much shared mirth on Twitter recently over a blog post by Quentin Hardy (@qhardy), the Deputy Tech Editor and The New York Times. The short post was titled IBM’s Big Plans for Cloud Computing, and it is worth a read, if nothing else than for a little context of what IBM is thinking about cloud. Featuring Lance Crosby (@lavosby), CEO and Founder of SoftLayer (recently acquired by IBM), it did indeed have some choice hyperbole. For example, this gem:

Read more »

The ‘Myth’ of the Mainframe Cloud

The ‘Myth’ of the Mainframe Cloud

Recently I read an interesting piece by Quentin Hardy (@qhardy), the Deputy Tech Editor and The New York Times on IBM’s Big Plans for Cloud Computing. Featuring Lance Crosby (@lavosby), CEO and Founder of SoftLayer (recently acquired by IBM), it raised the always-expected but never-delivered notion of an IBM mainframe cloud.

Read more »

Fantastic Cloud Expo West … Again!

Fantastic Cloud Expo West … Again!

This past week I attended the 13th International Cloud Expo West out in Santa Clara. Once again it was a fantastic event. I had meetings with some really interesting start-ups in cloud, attended several excellent sessions, met with some great friends from years past, and made some new friends too. Apart from all that, I was there to present too. My session was on “Harnessing APIs to Deliver Competitive Applications in the ‘Cloud Of Clouds’”. You can read the abstract here, or you can download a PDF of the whole deck here. I guess it was perhaps an overly SEO-heavy title, but in all seriousness, the intersection of rapid innovation, cloud computing, API economy, and devops – the core of this presentation – is a critical space that I am very excited about. In this preso, I explained the modern consumer-driven world of IT, where customers and staff expect everything…

Read more »

CloudViews Unplugged: March 2013

CloudViews Unplugged: March 2013

In this episode of CloudViews Unplugged, Andi Mann and George Watt of CA Technologies discuss migration to the cloud, IBM’s Watson helps oncologists develop cancer treatments, green cloud algorithms, and the zombie alert issued over the Emergency Alert System.

Read more »

CA Putting Cloud Pieces Together

CA Putting Cloud Pieces Together

I was interviewed for a great article published today in CRN titled, “CA Putting Cloud Pieces Together”. In it, Jack McCarthy writes:

Read more »

The Cost of Innovation in Virtualization and Cloud?

The Cost of Innovation in Virtualization and Cloud?

I was pointed the other day to a chart on the Business Insider ‘Chart of the Day’ (@chartoftheday) showing the R&D expenditures for a handful of tech companies, evidence of Apple’s supposedly superior ‘innovation’ compared to four apparently randomly chosen tech companies. On the surface, I thought it was an interesting idea, so I looked at R&D spending in companies that are actually related, in the virtualization and cloud computing space. With a little research on Google Finance, I put together the following chart: While it is interesting to look at these numbers, and individual comparisons can be somewhat revealing, I don’t see a reliable correlation between technology innovation and R&D spending – either as a percentage of revenues, or an absolute amount. I’ll just leave it here though. Feel free to comment on what you think this means. Appendix: For the Inquisitive If you are geek like me, you…

Read more »

Mainframe as an Enterprise Desktop Virtualization Server?

Mainframe as an Enterprise Desktop Virtualization Server?

In my last blog, I talked about the idea of a ‘software mainframe’, and how – if that term really means anything – IBM could actually be a serious threat to VMware (and the Virtual Computing Environment coalition of VMware/Cisco/EMC) , if it decided to support native Windows guests on its zSeries mainframes. As I noted in that post, I think this is far from impossible, and would change the face of the server virtualization substantially. After I published that blog it occurred to me that IBM’s biggest opportunity may not be (or may not only be) in server virtualization. After all, VMware has a pretty good lock on that market right now, so simply getting penetration would be very tough (just ask Microsoft!). Plus, scaling out a zSeries platform with 1000 or more virtual servers in one hit is a major project, with a major upfront hardware budget, that…

Read more »

“Software Mainframe” – a Poor Analogy for Virtualization

“Software Mainframe” – a Poor Analogy for Virtualization

IT loves analogies. Seriously, will the computer-as-a-car analogy ever die (please)? It has been over 10 years since we first heard jokes about if Microsoft built cars: At a computer expo (COMDEX) Bill Gates reportedly compared the computer industry with the auto industry and stated “If GM had kept up with technology like the computer industry has, we would all be driving twenty-five dollar cars that got 1000 miles/gallon.” Recently General Motors addressed this comment by releasing the statement : “Yeah, but would you want your car to crash twice a day?” It has been popular ever since. Citrix stretched the car analogy significantly last year, comparing VDI to a truck, XenDesktop (or was it XenApp?) to a Prius (or was it an SUV?), and XenServer to a Porsche (with Xen as the engine, ‘natch). This year Citrix again used some kind of car analogy, but the compact car was…

Read more »

Is ‘VM Stall’ the Next Big Virtualization Challenge?

Is ‘VM Stall’ the Next Big Virtualization Challenge?

There appears to be a challenger to ‘VM sprawl’ as the scourge of virtualization success - a problem I call ‘VM stall’. We know about ‘VM sprawl’ – because new virtual machines are so easy to deploy, organizations can end up with more VMs that they can handle, or even use. This has the potential to cause severe problems to availability, performance, compliance, costs, security, and more. However, I am seeing more and more evidence of this new phenomenon I think of as ‘VM stall’ – the tendency for virtualization deployments to stall once the ‘low-hanging fruit’ has been converted (typically around 20-30% of servers). I think it happens more or less like this...

Read more »

Is KVM a credible choice for x86 server virtualization?

Is KVM a credible choice for x86 server virtualization?

The other day I saw someone post a poll question, “Is KVM a credible choice for x86 virtualization?” My immediate response was – “Is that even a credible question?” If you read my many contributions to TechTarget, you will know I am no great supporter of KVM (Kernel Virtual Machine). In my analysis, it does not offer any significant advantages to the many alternatives. It does, however, introduce many significant challenges. The only significant and unique benefit of KVM for server virtualization (as noted by Sander van Vugt in our (virtual) debate on Xen vs.KVM Linux Virtualization Hypervisors) is that KVM is part of the Linux kernel. This ensures broad standardization, patch compatibility, simpler upgrades, and a low-impact on-ramp for existing Linux IT shops. Yet this is a solution for a problem that does not really exist.

Read more »

Novell Announces Intelligent Workload Management (IWM)

Novell Announces Intelligent Workload Management (IWM)

Today Novell released the details of their eagerly awaited Intelligent Workload Management (IWM) solutions. Novell has an exceptional opportunity, great development, and an excellent product line that clearly makes sense in this newly defined ‘market’. Plus, Novell really had to respond to their seriously lackluster financial performance in their 4th Quarter and Annual earnings announcement,

Read more »