Posts Tagged ‘ cloud computing ’

In Cloud, ITIL, and SOE – Heterogeneity is the New Standard

In Cloud, ITIL, and SOE – Heterogeneity is the New Standard

I read recently a good blog post from Thomas Bittman (@tombitt) of Gartner Group, about how sometimes close enough is good enough. Talking specifically about private cloud, he talked about how an ‘imperfect’ cloud deployment – one that does not have all five essential characteristics, for example – might be enough for some organizations. I especially appreciated how he highlighted some very specific, real-world examples to sustain his advice. As he shows, sometimes you don’t need a ‘100%’ implementation, and for very good business reasons. Not every IT organization needs a fully self-service interface, and many smaller organizations see no value in usage metering. They simply want to deliver services faster. For them, a 70% private cloud is absolutely good enough … it all comes down to business requirements, return on investment, and future strategy. How far you go is your decision. via Driving for Imperfection With Your Private Cloud.…

Read more »

Your Favourite Technology Will Not Kill Anything

Your Favourite Technology Will Not Kill Anything

I have a request. I hope it is not too onerous, because something is really starting to grind my gears. Can we in IT please all stop claiming that any technology is going to kill another? The latest I am reading, for example, is that NoSQL (for want of a better term) will kill off SQL. No, it won’t. My hyperbole aside, I know this with complete and utter certainty, even though I am barely conversant in database technologies. Seriously, SQL hasn’t even killed off VSAM – first released in 1974 – which is still the foundation for a huge volume, perhaps even the majority, of our daily financial, logistics, retail, and government business. In fact, not only are we still storing data in VSAM, we are still programming in COBOL, and even doing it on 20 year old mainframes. So realistically, an upstart like NoSQL has no chance of…

Read more »

In Cloud Computing, Downtime is Endemic – But Does it Matter?

In Cloud Computing, Downtime is Endemic – But Does it Matter?

There is a perennial debate in cloud computing about whether a failure of one cloud service provider can be more generalized to a “failure of cloud computing”. It is an important question because availability is a key decision factor in choosing between private and public cloud, and between public cloud providers. The most recent example of such failures is the power outage at IaaS provider Rackspace’s London facility, but of course, we have seen this before from many public cloud providers – including Rackspace in particular, and not just once. SaaS provider Salesforce.com (and its PaaS arm, Force.com) has also had one outage already this year, an event that is far from unusual, and nothing new. Amazon, Yahoo, Microsoft, GoGrid, RIM, Twitter, Paypal and many others have also had substantial (and often repeated) outages.

Read more »

Is KVM a credible choice for x86 server virtualization?

Is KVM a credible choice for x86 server virtualization?

The other day I saw someone post a poll question, “Is KVM a credible choice for x86 virtualization?” My immediate response was – “Is that even a credible question?” If you read my many contributions to TechTarget, you will know I am no great supporter of KVM (Kernel Virtual Machine). In my analysis, it does not offer any significant advantages to the many alternatives. It does, however, introduce many significant challenges. The only significant and unique benefit of KVM for server virtualization (as noted by Sander van Vugt in our (virtual) debate on Xen vs.KVM Linux Virtualization Hypervisors) is that KVM is part of the Linux kernel. This ensures broad standardization, patch compatibility, simpler upgrades, and a low-impact on-ramp for existing Linux IT shops. Yet this is a solution for a problem that does not really exist.

Read more »

Novell Announces Intelligent Workload Management (IWM)

Novell Announces Intelligent Workload Management (IWM)

Today Novell released the details of their eagerly awaited Intelligent Workload Management (IWM) solutions. Novell has an exceptional opportunity, great development, and an excellent product line that clearly makes sense in this newly defined ‘market’. Plus, Novell really had to respond to their seriously lackluster financial performance in their 4th Quarter and Annual earnings announcement,

Read more »

You Cannot Separate Security and Systems Management

You Cannot Separate Security and Systems Management

A few days ago I was pleased to brief again with Reflex Systems. Apart from the fact that they are doing some very cool things with virtualization management, their approach struck me as, if not unique, at least pleasantly rare. Good for them! What I liked most was that they are trying to break down the barriers between systems and security management.

Read more »

Virtualization is not Cloud … but Cloud needs Virtualization

Virtualization is not Cloud … but Cloud needs Virtualization

Surfing  a couple of blogs today, jumping from another analyst commenting that virtualization is not cloud (a fair, if unexplored, post), I came across William Vambenepe’s post from September on the confusion between virtualization and Cloud Computing. As he did on my blog recently, I started to post a reply to his site, and then as it expanded, decided to post it as a full reply on my own blog. I like the thinking, and agree with a lot of the principles involved. Without doubt, virtualization is not cloud. But I can’t agree with it all. Apart from technical quibbles (like the part about mainframe LPARs not running on a hypervisor), I simply find it unreasonable, if not impossible, to think of implementing cloud computing without virtualization.

Read more »

Cloud Computing Podcast with Techtarget – Part 2

Cloud Computing Podcast with Techtarget – Part 2

My podcast with SearchCloudComputing‘s Carl Brooks (Twitter’s @eekygeeky) was so much fun. In this two-part podcast, Carl and I talk about all sorts of issues regarding the management of cloud computing – a critical part of EMA’s ‘Responsible Cloud’ approach to cloud computing. Of course I had too much to say to fit in just a single short burst, so this post is about part 2 of the podcast.

Read more »

Cloud Computing Podcast with Techtarget – Part 1

Cloud Computing Podcast with Techtarget – Part 1

I really enjoyed my first podcast with the crew from SearchCloudComputing – hosted by Carl Brooks (Twitter’s @eekygeeky) – last week. (Of course I did – I am an analyst. If there is one thing I love more than being asked my opinion, it is talking about my opinion!). In this two-part podcast, Carl and I talk about all sorts of issues regarding the management of cloud computing – a critical part of EMA’s ‘Responsible Cloud’ approach to cloud computing.

Read more »

What is Wrong With the NIST Definition of Cloud Computing?

What is Wrong With the NIST Definition of Cloud Computing?

I am getting so sick of the continual bickering over definitions of cloud computing. Even more frustrating is the hype from all the vested interests – vendors and analysts, mostly – trying to define cloud computing in ways that they imagine will best contribute to their own commercial success. And I know that I am not alone. What is wrong with the definition that the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) – a division of the US Department of Commerce – uses?

Read more »

ITPA/WLA in a Cloud Computing Model – Infastructure or Service Automation?

ITPA/WLA in a Cloud Computing Model – Infastructure or Service Automation?

I was recently discussing EMA’s basic architecture for cloud computing. Essentially, this chart from a recent presentation, given to a workload automation audience, is starting to form the basis for a maturity model for cloud computing:

Read more »